Young-Davidson gold mine

Young-Davidson Underground Gold Mine is located near the town of Matachewan, nearly 60km west of Kirkland Lake in Matachewan, Ontario.

The property consists of contiguous mineral leases and claims totaling 11,000 acres, and is situated on the site of two past producing mines that produced one million ounces from 1934-1957. The Young-Davidson open pit mine achieved commercial production on September 1, 2012, and on October 31, 2013, the Company declared commercial production at the Young-Davidson underground mine following the commissioning of the shaft hoisting system. Open pit mining ceased in June 2014 upon depletion of the reserve; however, stockpiled open pit ore will supplement mill feed until underground production rates have ramped up to design levels.

The underground mine has been designed for low operating costs through the use of large modern equipment, gravity movement of ore and waste through raises, shaft hoisting, minimal ore and waste re-handling, high productivity bulk mining methods and paste backfill. The mine operates scooptrams to load, haul and transfer stope production to the ore pass system from where it is hoisted to the surface via 18 tonne skips.

Ownership: 

100% – Alamos Gold

Deposit Type:

Orogenic, Veins.

Young-Davidson is situated within the southwestern part of the Abitibi Greenstone Belt, one of the largest greenstone belts in the world with historic production of 160 million ounces of gold. The Abitibi consists of a complex and diverse array of volcanic, sedimentary, and plutonic rocks typically metamorphosed to greenschist facies grade, but locally attaining amphibolite facies grade. Volcanic rocks range in composition from rhyolitic to komatiitic and commonly occur as mafic to felsic volcanic cycles. Sedimentary rocks consist of both chemical and clastic varieties and occur as both intravolcanic sequences and as uncomformably overlying sequences. A wide spectrum of mafic to felsic, pre-tectonic, syn-tectonic and post-tectonic intrusive rocks are present. All lithologies are cut by late, generally northeast-trending proterozoic diabase dikes. Within the Abitibi lies the Kirkland-Larder Lake trend, home to several gold camps including Young-Davidson, with combined historic production of 34 million ounces of gold.

Type of Mine: 

Underground, accessed via Shaft and Ramp.

Mining Methods:

Longhole open stoping; paste backfill.

The Young-Davidson underground mine has been designed for low operating costs through the use of large modern equipment, gravity movement of ore and waste through raises, shaft hoisting, minimal ore and waste re-handling, high productivity bulk mining methods (long hole open stoping) and paste backfill. The mine operates scooptrams to load, haul and transfer stope production to the ore pass system from where it is hoisted to the surface via 18 tonne skips.

Processing Method: 

Conventional crushing and grinding, gravity concentration followed by flotation, conventional carbon-in-leach and electro-winning.

The underground ore and stockpiled open pit ore is processed through an 8,000 tpd single stage semi-autogenous grinding circuit with a gravity circuit followed by flotation. The flotation concentrate is further ground and leached in a conventional carbon-in-leach. The flotation tailings are also leached in a carbon-in-leach circuit. The gold is recovered from the carbon followed by electro-winning and pouring doré bars. The Young-Davidson carbon-in-leach tailings are treated with the SO2/Air cyanide destruction method. The paste backfill plant was commissioned in 2014 and is capable of supplying paste fill to the underground voids at a rate in excess of 8,000 tonnes per day.

Milling/Processing Capacity: 

8,000 tonnes per day

Mine Life‎: ‎

13 years (as of Jan 1, 2019)

Gold Production (2019): 

188,000 ounces

AISC (2019): 

$1,047 per ounce

Gold Reserves (proven and probable, 2019): 

3.1 million ounces

Gold Resources (measured and indicated, 2019): 

1.2 million ounces

Gold Resources (inferred, 2019): 

0.1 million ounces

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